An Oakmoss Summer

Our program line-up for the Summer of 2015 includes two field outings and a hands-on workshop in East Aurora, NY as we continue our mission to share the lessons of Nature to benefit the planet and all its inhabitants. Details and registration information available on our website. Please join us!

Twilight Trek
Saturday, July 11 – 7:00 to 9:00pm at West Falls Park. Enjoy an interpretive stroll through the woods and along the creek at dusk, one of the most active times of day as diurnal creatures wind down and nocturnal critters begin to rouse.

Field Flutterers
Saturday, July 25 – 9:00am to 11:30am at Knox Farm State Park. We’ll be seeking out the flighted creatures of the open field, be they insect or avian. From butterflies to birds, there are many species that fill the morning with activity.

Introduction to Herbal Concoctions
Saturday, August 1 – 1:00pm to 3:30pm at the Roycroft Campus Power House. A hands-on workshop in which students will become acquainted with incorporating common herbs into simple preparations for body care and overall general health.

Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 4

Here is the fourth installment in our Habitat Restoration Series for Spring.
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Native Plantings for WNY/Southern Ontario – Submission #4 for wet/moist soils:
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Catail (Typha latifolia)Common Cattail (Typha latifolia): Native to North American wetlands, shores, banks and even ditches, Cattails are an important species for wildlife. Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and certain species of duck and geese will use Cattail “groves” for nesting. Fish can find safety from prey and sun in the Cattails or lay their eggs among them (as do many other aquatic animals) while Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) and Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) use them as a food source. Growing from rhizomes, Cattails are generally found in clumps or stands where each individual is often a genetic clone of its neighbor. The dense growth of Cattails has other benefits, including filtration of water and erosion prevention. Traditionally, these plants were an important protein source in Spring among native peoples who also made use of the leaves for weaving baskets and mats, the fluff for insulation and padding, and fibers for string or paper. Cattails are being challenged for habitat by the invasive Common Reed (Phragmites australis) and can really use our help in getting established in suitable locations. So if you’ve an area where it is continually wet and soggy or is characterized by seasonal flooding, Cattails might be an excellent candidate. Wildlife will appreciate it and you will be able to enjoy those “sausage heads” swaying in the Summer breeze.

Previous posts in this series:

Winterberry (Ilex verticillata)
Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis)
Serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis)

Amphibian Demise in the Hands of Humans

Amphibians are bell-weathers for environmental health and so many currently are at risk, mostly due to human activities. Habitat loss and invasive species introductions are taking a tremendous toll. Add to that the mysterious Chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis), which is decimating frogs by the millions worldwide. The spread of this deadly fungus also has been linked to humans through global trade and historic commonly used human pregnancy testing.

A recent film on the plight of the Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) in British Columbia spotlights the precarious state of amphibian populations. It reminds us strongly that our behavior has ramifications far beyond the immediate and deeply thought out planning that includes potential consequences should be part of our daily agenda.

Video directed by Mike McKinlay and Isabelle Groc
Research, Story, and Interview: Isabelle Groc tidelife.ca
Cinematography and Edit: Mike McKinlay mikemckinlay.com
Original Music and Sound Mix: Mark Lazeski
Online Edit and Colour Correction: George Faulkner gbfaulkner.com
Camera Assistant: Steve Breckon

This video was produced with the support of the Wilderness Committee and the Vancouver Foundation