Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 2

Here is our second installment in our Habitat Restoration Series for Spring.
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Native Plantings for WNY/Southern Ontario – Submission #2 for wet/moist soils:
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Common Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis)

web_MistyElderberryThese shrubs grow best in rich, moist, neutral soils that have good drainage. I have mine planted on a very shallow slope just above a very mucky spot and they do tremendously well. Sunlight should be from full sun to partial shade (they are often found along the woodland edge in the wild). They will shoot up new canes each year and are subject to spreading so you can choose a spot where they can spread at will or control them through pruning back older woody canes or mowing. It generally takes from 3 to 5 years for fruits to develop after planting young canes. Flowers develop in June so are not usually subject to fruit loss due to frost. Fruits begin to ripen in late Summer and persist well into October. This area native has many, many benefits. It is rich in vitamin C and potassium and has many medicinal qualities, especially in terms of the immune system.

Homeopathically (like treats like) Elderberry is considered to be good for the areas of the body that are “tubular” or “hollow” – blood, respiratory, nerves – based on the plant’s hollow stems. Both flowers and fruits can be used. Be advised that raw Elderberries Elders in flower on "The Acre"can have a strong cathartic effect so we advise that the fruits be heated for 5 minutes to neutralize those characteristics (generally small amounts may be eaten raw – just be prudent). Wildlife thrives on the berries and these shrubs can produce more than enough for sharing. You can have your pie, wine, jam and medicinals while leaving enough for birds and deer to “fatten up” on for Winter.

Sources for Elderberry, other than local nurseries, can be found on our webpage. Be sure you choose the Sambucus canadensis varietal as this is the true native in Eastern North America.
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Did you miss Submission #1? Have no fear, you can read all about Winterberry HERE!

6 thoughts on “Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 2

  1. Pingback: Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 3 | Oakmoss Education

  2. Pingback: Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 4 | Oakmoss Education

  3. Pingback: Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 5 | Oakmoss Education

  4. Pingback: Habitat Restoration Series: Native Plant Suggestions for Western New York/Southern Ontario – Part 1 | Oakmoss Education

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